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Offline samfun1103  
#1 Posted : Thursday, March 31, 2016 8:52:16 PM(UTC)
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Been looking at building or buying a computer lately, and been noticing the two types, AMD or Intel, I prefer Intel, but what is up with AMD? Just discuss here, I can't be the only one that's curious. gringrin
Offline fortunz  
#2 Posted : Thursday, March 31, 2016 9:30:47 PM(UTC)
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Intel wins in two spaces - performance and power efficiency. The Core i processors are what you get if you want power. A lower powered Atom (sometimes branded as pentium or celeron) can be built into some HTPCs that are very video-centric (no gaming) and it appears in prebuilds tablets and even phones due to its energy efficiency. Core M isn't available for builds, to my knowledge, but is very respectable in tablets and laptops. IIRC Core M Broadwell was about as good fanless as Core i Haswell was with fans. AMD doesn't, in my view, really compete with any of these processors (except a little with Atom by stealing more general purpose HTPCs that can also game a little), though I admit I'm not 100% sure where the non-APU AM3 processors fall, but given how far behind AMD is, I assume they mostly compete with previous generation Intel Core Is, like Haswell or Ivy Bridge, rather than Broadwell or the most recent generation Skylake.

Instead AMD has carved out a value niche where they offer unparalleled bang for the buck. If you don't need the speediest of the speedy, you can get decent performance from an AMD APU especially for a song. I'm especially behind when it comes to Intel's integrated gfx (Iris), but last I heard AMD's integrated graphics were far superior even while CPU performance lagged. Most of the cheap gaming laptops will pack AMD APUs and a lot of HTPCs and budget gaming rigs will as well. It's really stunning how cheap an AMD APU upgrade can be, especially if you can recycle your current case, PSU and drives. An APU, mobo and RAM might run you less than an older core i3 processor alone.

So if you can afford it, you get intel and a dedicated graphics card. If money is tight or the use you're putting a particular machine to is lighter, there are places where AMD's value is sought after. Be sure to check out the thread on AMD Zen. It's possible that they could reclaim a lot of ground this year and compete with Intel in more areas.

thanks 1 user thanked fortunz for this useful post.
bsryan on 4/6/2016(UTC)
Offline tmanvest  
#3 Posted : Thursday, March 31, 2016 11:41:30 PM(UTC)
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if you want a budget build go amd but for intel you are looking at a pretty steep premium for their non overclocking cpus but as long as you have a quad core cpu at 3ghz you should be fine. most gaming today is done on the gpu so that should be what you save up for. just to note hyperthreading is not like adding another core so i3s are all dual cores even if they have hyperthreading.

Edited by user Thursday, March 31, 2016 11:45:07 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Offline Blackhawk8100  
#4 Posted : Friday, April 1, 2016 10:36:07 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: fortunz Go to Quoted Post
Intel wins in two spaces - performance and power efficiency. The Core i processors are what you get if you want power. A lower powered Atom (sometimes branded as pentium or celeron) can be built into some HTPCs that are very video-centric (no gaming) and it appears in prebuilds tablets and even phones due to its energy efficiency. Core M isn't available for builds, to my knowledge, but is very respectable in tablets and laptops. IIRC Core M Broadwell was about as good fanless as Core i Haswell was with fans. AMD doesn't, in my view, really compete with any of these processors (except a little with Atom by stealing more general purpose HTPCs that can also game a little), though I admit I'm not 100% sure where the non-APU AM3 processors fall, but given how far behind AMD is, I assume they mostly compete with previous generation Intel Core Is, like Haswell or Ivy Bridge, rather than Broadwell or the most recent generation Skylake.

Instead AMD has carved out a value niche where they offer unparalleled bang for the buck. If you don't need the speediest of the speedy, you can get decent performance from an AMD APU especially for a song. I'm especially behind when it comes to Intel's integrated gfx (Iris), but last I heard AMD's integrated graphics were far superior even while CPU performance lagged. Most of the cheap gaming laptops will pack AMD APUs and a lot of HTPCs and budget gaming rigs will as well. It's really stunning how cheap an AMD APU upgrade can be, especially if you can recycle your current case, PSU and drives. An APU, mobo and RAM might run you less than an older core i3 processor alone.

So if you can afford it, you get intel and a dedicated graphics card. If money is tight or the use you're putting a particular machine to is lighter, there are places where AMD's value is sought after. Be sure to check out the thread on AMD Zen. It's possible that they could reclaim a lot of ground this year and compete with Intel in more areas.

What you didn't mention is what you plan to do with the PC. AMD Processors would work for gaming/light-med. work and Intel would be for gaming, high levels of work and recording/encoding. It all depends on your plans for the PC :P

Offline fortunz  
#5 Posted : Friday, April 1, 2016 2:31:07 PM(UTC)
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I do like to discuss overall capability in terms of performance, power efficiency and value, though even I mentioned some specific use cases like HTPC and budget gaming. It's just that the former help someone design a much more specific rig fit to them rather than a broad one-size-fits-all category. Not all 'budget gamers' are created equal and there's more than one way to save on a rig.
Offline DoctorlyGreg  
#6 Posted : Wednesday, December 7, 2016 3:48:25 PM(UTC)
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Amd is underrated in my opinion. They offer decent price and quality processors and graphics card, but with the draw backs of heat and noise.
Offline Blackhawk8100  
#7 Posted : Wednesday, December 7, 2016 8:46:55 PM(UTC)
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We will have to see how Zen does...
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