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Offline wbsgrepit  
#1 Posted : Saturday, October 24, 2015 3:30:17 PM(UTC)
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Sorry cross posted this I did not see the cooling sub until just now..

Has anyone here ever had a closed loop system fail? If so hat chances do I have that my system will not be a total loss, I had my water break on my motherboard and ram (it seems to have missed the CPU socket) but the system was running and fized out -- I am sure some parts are fried but not sure how much of the system should be considered a loss.

Thanks!

Also thanks for running the CyberPower Trinity Xtreme PC contest, I need a replacment and my fingers are crossed!crying

Offline wbsgrepit  
#2 Posted : Saturday, October 24, 2015 4:17:49 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Blackhawk8100 Go to Quoted Post
Do you have spare parts you don't care about? Test them in your rig, and they may end up fried, but if it works, you know what it broken. You also may want to go to a PC repair shop and see what they can do. They would know best. See what you can do, as not everything may be fried, you may get luck, any parts you can remove(RAM etc.), remove and put in a big bowl of rice to dry out immediately. I am assuming your problem was jsut now, so let things dry out for a day or two before powering back on. Remove all power from the system by unplugging and holding the power button for 10 seconds I believe. If you have a desktop, turn off the PSU in the case by a switch on it that only has on and off. Wait a few days, let it dry out. Maybe add a fan too, a box fan or something like it pointing at a completely open case with as many panels off as possible with help.

I do have some spares but not enough for a full system. When this happened (2 days ago) I unplugged the system and placed the memory and motherboard in a big ziplock with rice and and hoping that that will suck out as much of the coolant as possible. The coolant was from a closed loop system so I am not sure what it is but it does seem to be a little sticky when dried. I am wondering if anyone else has had this problem and what their outcomes were, I don;t really want to risk placing parts in the system if they are just going to fry out. My assumption is that the mainboard and ram are very suspect and likley to cause shorts but other things like gpu/cpu/power supply etc that were not directly "wet" I am hoping would be savable.

A word of advice for folks out there with closed loop systems, my issue was caused by my coolmaster 240m tubes being pressed from the side panel after reattaching the side panel, be careful with placement of the tubes -- in my case I did not see that they had moved to the outside of the GPU and when the panel pressed it applied pressure to the connector points on the fan.

Offline Blackhawk8100  
#3 Posted : Saturday, October 24, 2015 4:21:16 PM(UTC)
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Yeah, may just want to contact Coolermaster, see what they say. They would probably help you the most.
Offline drhutchinson  
#4 Posted : Monday, October 26, 2015 12:59:46 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: wbsgrepit Go to Quoted Post

A word of advice for folks out there with closed loop systems, my issue was caused by my coolmaster 240m tubes being pressed from the side panel after reattaching the side panel, be careful with placement of the tubes -- in my case I did not see that they had moved to the outside of the GPU and when the panel pressed it applied pressure to the connector points on the fan.

Thanks for the advice! I'm planning on using a closed loop system for my next build, probably, and I'm worried the case I got might be a bit small. Definitely going to return my case and go with a bigger option.

Offline Blackhawk8100  
#5 Posted : Monday, October 26, 2015 11:41:08 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: drhutchinson Go to Quoted Post
Thanks for the advice! I'm planning on using a closed loop system for my next build, probably, and I'm worried the case I got might be a bit small. Definitely going to return my case and go with a bigger option.

You could do hard-tubing fr your setup...

Offline acarzt  
#6 Posted : Monday, October 26, 2015 3:04:56 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Blackhawk8100 Go to Quoted Post
Do you have spare parts you don't care about? Test them in your rig, and they may end up fried, but if it works, you know what it broken. You also may want to go to a PC repair shop and see what they can do. They would know best. See what you can do, as not everything may be fried, you may get luck, any parts you can remove(RAM etc.), remove and put in a big bowl of rice to dry out immediately. I am assuming your problem was jsut now, so let things dry out for a day or two before powering back on. Remove all power from the system by unplugging and holding the power button for 10 seconds I believe. If you have a desktop, turn off the PSU in the case by a switch on it that only has on and off. Wait a few days, let it dry out. Maybe add a fan too, a box fan or something like it pointing at a completely open case with as many panels off as possible with help.

This was bad advice...

First off, rice will NOT dry your system out faster... this is a terrible Myth.

Second, you do not want to hit the power button with the PSU attached even while it is unplugged... the capacitors on the PSU contain a charge, and you risk causing further damage.

What you need to do, is remove power, isolate the PSU and disassemble the PC entirely. Remove your CMOS battery as well.

You need to air dry everything.

After a couple of days of air drying, you are going to need some alcohol, cotton swabs/q-tips, a bright light and a magnifying glass.

You will need to go over every single peice of hardware looking for any water spots. You need to get the cotton swabs damp, and gently clean any surfaces that appear to have water damage or any liquid/residue.

Also check for blown capacitors and fried chips. You can do a google images search to see what those look like.

DO NOT OPEN YOUR PSU!!!!!!! I cannot stress that enough! Even with power removed, it can HURT you! Even KILL you!

If you got any water in your PSU, just throw it away and get a new one. You are better safe than sorry!

After thoroughly cleaning all your components with alcohol, let them dry for a day and reassemble.

If you're lucky, everything will come right back up without a problem. Electronics are more resilient than people give them credit for... but there are some things you just can't come back from!

Good luck!

Edited by user Monday, October 26, 2015 3:06:53 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Offline acarzt  
#7 Posted : Monday, October 26, 2015 3:09:35 PM(UTC)
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Also... Out of curiosity... Sounds like the system was on when the leak occured... Did you power the system off, or did it shut down on it's own?
Offline Blackhawk8100  
#8 Posted : Monday, November 2, 2015 10:17:36 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: acarzt Go to Quoted Post
Also... Out of curiosity... Sounds like the system was on when the leak occured... Did you power the system off, or did it shut down on it's own?

He is never coming back xD

Offline acarzt  
#9 Posted : Monday, November 2, 2015 10:51:21 PM(UTC)
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I think you're right lol
Offline Blackhawk8100  
#10 Posted : Monday, November 2, 2015 10:54:33 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: acarzt Go to Quoted Post
I think you're right lol

You should have quoted him xD :P

Offline acarzt  
#11 Posted : Monday, November 2, 2015 11:06:48 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: wbsgrepit Go to Quoted Post
Sorry cross posted this I did not see the cooling sub until just now..

Has anyone here ever had a closed loop system fail? If so hat chances do I have that my system will not be a total loss, I had my water break on my motherboard and ram (it seems to have missed the CPU socket) but the system was running and fized out -- I am sure some parts are fried but not sure how much of the system should be considered a loss.

Thanks!

Also thanks for running the CyberPower Trinity Xtreme PC contest, I need a replacment and my fingers are crossed!crying

So were you able to get this thing working?

Offline Blackhawk8100  
#12 Posted : Monday, November 2, 2015 11:59:14 PM(UTC)
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-.-
Offline StaticFX  
#13 Posted : Tuesday, November 3, 2015 2:49:38 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: acarzt Go to Quoted Post

DO NOT OPEN YOUR PSU!!!!!!! I cannot stress that enough! Even with power removed, it can HURT you! Even KILL you!

If you got any water in your PSU, just throw it away and get a new one. You are better safe than sorry!

Good luck!

Yeah.. no. this is completely false.. the myth stems from the old CRT monitors and the capacitors used in them.. They were very dangerous. 99% of all Modern PSUs have whats known as bleed resistors. . If you spent decent money on your PSU then im sure yours has it as well. Even the not so great ones have them.

Unplug the PSU. just give it a few minutes... if its high wattage, wait an hour.. or even a full day if you really want to be safe. Then you can open it up. I have changed fans and cleaned out numerous PSUs.

Courtesy of Overclock.net (http://www.overclock.net/a/capacitor-safety-in-power-supplies)

UserPostedImage

Many modders completely overhaul their PSUs, clear bodies.. lighted fans.. etc. Its safe

Offline Tatoosh  
#14 Posted : Sunday, November 8, 2015 9:34:38 AM(UTC)
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Capacitors can be tricky. We had some really big ones in our transmitters in the Navy. We had a big a** cap discharge tool. The ones in your PSU are not quite so big, so maybe this will work:

Cap Discharge Tool - small

Offline Blackhawk8100  
#15 Posted : Sunday, November 8, 2015 12:15:29 PM(UTC)
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Why did you have big capacitors in the navy? What were they for? A mainframe or something?
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