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Offline Sergeimm  
#1 Posted : Friday, November 19, 2010 10:02:54 AM(UTC)
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Hi guys really need some help here. I want to built a gaming pc. The problem is a lot of new tech coming out in 2011 and it seems impractical to buy high end stuff. At firt wanted to get i7950 afre the price fell to 300 but now I am considering AMD looks even cheaper and mobo is cheaper as well. Was thinking of getting Phenom II X6 1090T but was thinking if no games are utilizing more than 4 cores do I really need to pay that much. Really do not know much about all the stuff.
What do you think of: AMD Phenom II X4 965 Black Edition Deneb 3.4GHz 4 x 512KB L2 Cache 6MB L3 Cache Socket AM3 125W Quad-Core Processor HDZ965FBGMBOX its only 160 $

What do you think would be good mobo? what about ASUS M4A88T-V EVO/USB3 AM3 AMD 880G USB 3.0 HDMI ATX AMD Motherboard its only 109

For video thinking of getting gtx 460 around 160-200$

HD- het 1 TB its like 50$ now. advise what kind is good plz.
Don't really know about memory much please help. what would be good here 6 gb? ddr3 what kind.


With theses main components I am looking at very good price, but performance wise what can you tell me. Would I be able to play most of the games on high resolution. What is the bottleneck here. And also what would be a part in wich I can't get get the maximum value of. Really apretiate any help.

I dont need sound card, just got logitech g35 headset.

Thanks


Offline lifeskills  
#2 Posted : Friday, November 19, 2010 5:11:06 PM(UTC)
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looks good to me.  I don't know too much about RAM either but i am running 8 gigs of kingson hyperx 1600 mhz and it works good.


Heres my power supply recomendation for you.  The modular one is nice as well, but more expensive.


http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139005&cm_re=corsair_650-_-17-139-005-_-Product


This setup will be able to play HD games, and adding another gtx460 will add much performance down the road.  Should be a nice cheap build too.  

Offline Der Meister  
#3 Posted : Friday, November 19, 2010 11:51:36 PM(UTC)
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I would say get 4gb first 2x2gb and if you need more later then get it later. more than likely youll find you dont need it

Offline jonation  
#4 Posted : Thursday, December 23, 2010 8:03:49 AM(UTC)
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I agree with Der about the RAM, start low, then just add to it as you see fit. I haven't had a problem with 4 gigs of RAM. But if you have triple channel mobo(i.e. 6 total ram slots) i'd get a 6 gig set (3 x 2gig sticks) just to keep it in balanced. If your mobo has 4 total slots - go with 4 gig (2 x 2gig sticks).
RAM with the boards and processors you're looking at will be DDR3 1333 or (faster) DDR3 1600. Your mobo, normally on the website, should have a list of compatible RAM. If you look on newegg, the combos (mobo/ram) should be compatible with each other.

As far as CPU's microcenter (if there is one close to you) runs in-store sales on the i7-950 for $250 occasionally. If that is happening GET IT. I also saw the i7-875K for the same price.  The only thing with intels now is that they are pretty much ditching the i7 sockets in the long run. AMD has good compatibility throughout their lines. AMD Phenom X6 is great for the price, but the X4 still hauls a fair amount of a$$ for the price as well.



as far as mobos Asus are pretty solid, but I have been using MSI for a couple years now and haven't had any real issues.

HDD: i use only WD caviar blacks, a little pricier- but I've never had one die yet... (knock on wood). 

PSU: I love Corsair. They are borderline expensive- but i've had a cheap psu short out and shoot sparks into my rig... scary. Also if you see the term MODULAR it just means you choose how many power cables for molex (4pin) or sata (hdd) you have run. It's nice for cable managing a system with only 1 or 2 HDDs. The regular PSUs just have every possible connection run, it can turn into a mess if you just have 1 HDD, 1 GPU, 1 DVD/ROM.. etc. They always give you more than you need so you can expand. Modular you just plug connections into your PSU as you add to your system.

GTX 460, especially a super-clocked, will treat you right. Again if anything treat it like RAM, if you have an SLI board and you find yourself needing or wanting a little more, say to push a 1980x1080 widescreen TV, you could drop another (with black friday around) $140ish bucks and SLI the cards. With the lastest Nvidia drivers the scaling of SLI is impressive.


 

Offline jonation  
#5 Posted : Thursday, December 23, 2010 8:16:27 AM(UTC)
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Also are you looking at any case in particular? With nice components, you'll want good airflow to keep temps down and allow for more longevity of your purchases.
Just look at some of our signatures, I've had my old e6400 allendale running 50% (allendales have to be PUSHED) above stock speed for around 4 years now and it runs just as when I bought it. 

It's in the Dells and HPs with passive, bad cooling that you really see the aging of good components. 

Offline Sergeimm  
#6 Posted : Tuesday, February 1, 2011 8:39:33 AM(UTC)
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Thanks for the reply. Well I waited a bit with the build and was sure to go with i5 2500 k SB as it is just a bit more expensive than my original idea for the build. And yesterday I learn that intel is recalling all the mobos :(  Furthermore, nvidea released gtx 560 and although it is a bit more expensive than 460 I think its may be worth the money. but maybe 6950 ? is better.


 

Offline Der Meister  
#7 Posted : Tuesday, February 1, 2011 9:53:05 AM(UTC)
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the 6950 and the 570 are co matches between nvdida and AMD/ATI

Offline realneil  
#8 Posted : Tuesday, February 1, 2011 10:40:33 AM(UTC)
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The GTX-560Ti is a sweet spot in Graphics cards right now. (great performance for a decent price) I like the MSI card for it's two fan setup. Also, some of them are warrantied for life. The GTX-560Ti also has CUDA and PhysX support that the AMD cards don't have.


While I have to admit the quality of Corsair PSU's is very good, I personally prefer the SeaSonic Brand 80+ Bronze & Silver certified PSU's. They come with a 5 year warranty and I've never had one fail on me. They are extremely efficient too.


Since there are problems with the P67 chipset Mainboards, you may want to consider a P55 Instead. They are cheaper now that Sandy Bridge is out, and the i5-760 is an extremely powerful CPU that will lay waste to all of the games out today when combined with a decent Video Card. (see above) I see the P55 platform as an economical solution that will still be relevant a few years from now. My favorite P55 board is the ASRock P55-Pro because it's inexpensive, full featured, and it overclocks easily. I have two of them.

Offline RSmith  
#9 Posted : Tuesday, May 31, 2011 9:54:14 PM(UTC)
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I tend to agree with some of the hardware you've been looking at.  Honestly, if you can get just the 4GB DDR3 for now, then go for it, because RAM will eventually become less expensive over time.  As per the GPUs you're looking at, you're in a good spot.  Not too pricey, but still a lot of "oomph" potential.  Whether you go Nvidia or AMD, that's your preference, but either card is a great option.  My personal brand recommendation though is XFX or EVGA.  XFX has the better re-saleability, but both are great.  XFX does both AMD and Nvidia , wherein EVGA deals only with Nvidia.  The CPU option is also a decent plan, however over time more apps and games will utilize more cores, and you never know when you'll want to let your games run on up to 4 cores, whilst you set affinity for other apps to a designated 1 or 2 separate cores.  That ASUS mobo seems to be a decent unit, but maybe an MSI alternative would work as well.  i know ASUS tends to be 1 of the top-tier recommends, but they can tend to overprice their stuff sometimes, and their service n support are about 85% from my experience.  MSI has been better to me, so have Abit and Gigabyte.  Maybe a good brand would be Gigabyte, they still rock hard, especially in performance and gaming.  Good luck to you!

Offline bob_on_the_cob  
#10 Posted : Wednesday, June 1, 2011 5:00:10 AM(UTC)
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I'd say 4GBs is ok, but Windows 7 really does make good use of 8GBs. Maybe I'm not the average use case, but I find 4GBs a little tight and can easily use it up. Others may dissagree, but I usually buy pretty cheap ram. Name brands, but Kingston Value ram instead of HyperX. It used to be the case that low timings gained you a good bit of performance, but with the newer CPUs, death of FSB, and the high price you pay for tight timings I really feel like the extra money will net you much more in other areas.


As far as playing games at HD I would be looking more at something like the 560ti. The 460 should do you ok for the near future, but you might be wanting a upgrade not to far down the road if you go with that.

Offline rrplay  
#11 Posted : Wednesday, June 1, 2011 5:38:31 AM(UTC)
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Sergeimm wrote:


Thanks for the reply. Well I waited a bit with the build and was sure to go with i5 2500 k SB as it is just a bit more expensive than my original idea for the build. And yesterday I learn that intel is recalling all the mobos :(  Furthermore, nvidea released gtx 560 and although it is a bit more expensive than 460 I think its may be worth the money. but maybe 6950 ? is better.




It might be very interesting to see what hardware selections would be
available at a pre-determined price point for configuring & building
a rig since your last post There has been some very good feedback and the price / performance bang for buck today would be drastic.plenty of option available as previously posted to trim a bit $$ here and boost a bit of performance with graphics etc. New monitor ??


Are you still considering building with Intel or AMD ? an updated parts list may be helpful of what you maybe considering


.. unless of course you built it already.

Offline realneil  
#12 Posted : Wednesday, June 1, 2011 8:17:57 AM(UTC)
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rrplay wrote:
see what hardware selections would be
available at a pre-determined price point for configuring & building
a rig since your last post


Everything has changed drastically since this thread started with your first questions. The GTX-560Ti is out, (I have the MSI Twin Frozr one) and it is well worth the extra money over the GTX460 card. Also, as you said, the Sandy Bridge motherboards were recalled, but they have already been replaced for free by Intel. THEN Intel recently released the Z68 chipset to manufacturing and that includes some very nice technological advances over the original Sandy Bridge platform. It's a little confusing, but if you can afford this new platform, (Z68) and if you set it up properly, it's a better performer by far.




[quote user="Sergeimm"]but maybe 6950 is better?.


The GTX cards have the advantage of delivering PhysX and CUDA support for games. Some say that this is a non-issue, but I personally like these effects in my games and except for one XFX-Radeon HD6870, I've bought only NVIDIA Cards recently.


The XFX Radeon card is a great gaming video card. I have it in a very low-end dual core Phenom system using DDR2-800 RAM in a very inexpensive motherboard. (cheap, cheap, cheap) This is not typically what people buy for their gaming needs at all. But I built the PC on a whim when I had a little extra cash on hand. NewEgg had a 'combo-deal' sale going on and I bought it. I had the Radeon card on the shelf and decided to put it into this system. I was pleasantly surprised by my results. With this card in it, it's turned out to be a good gaming rig. I believe that the XFX card makes the difference too.


So I think that you should consider that you video card choice is going to be important and will have the most effect on your finished PC. Choose to spend a little more on Video, and you'll be happier in the long run. Some of the HD6950 cards that you mentioned can be hacked with a flash to the card's BIOS to enable near HD6970 performance. Not all of them do it, but if you can get it to work, it's a huge plus.


And as was said before, you may have already built this computer. If so, please tell us what you bought and how it's working for you.





Offline acarzt  
#13 Posted : Wednesday, June 1, 2011 9:08:16 AM(UTC)
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This is a rather old thread and any advice we give at this point would likely be rendered pointless lol


But all the same... I would rather have a regular GTX 560 vs the 560 ti. Saves you $50 and the performance is VERY close. if you go SLI you'll have then saved $100 and still have close performance. For $400 you can have a GTX 560 SLI setup and perfromance better than a single 580 and the ability to play any game currently on the market with max settings @ 1920x1080(or 1200).

Offline realneil  
#14 Posted : Wednesday, June 1, 2011 9:29:46 AM(UTC)
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acarzt wrote:
This is a rather old thread and any advice we give at this point would likely be rendered pointless


Unless he hasn't bought yet, and if he ever comes back to read it before he does. Maybe others are reading it and gathering information?




acarzt wrote:
I would rather have a regular GTX 560 vs the 560 ti. Saves you $50 and the performance is VERY close.


Good point, but the GTX-560 was released only recently. The Ti variant was first out of the gate, and I bought it because it looked good to me. It really is a nice card and I'm glad to have it. So far, I haven't needed to think about SLI because this card is in a system with a 22" screen, set to 1680X1050 resolution.

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