Marius Malek
2010-02-27T11:31:20Z

 

In the coming months I am planning on getting a solid computer featuring the i7 CPU's. More specifically I plan on getting the new PC from cyberpowerpc. Now, while browsing a plethora of hardware you can't help but notice all the "OC Certified" parts. 

Simply stated, when you overclock you are pushing your computer up 10-20%, right? 

So, with the i7 series already having great performance, is it even worth it to spend considerably more money? 

-Thanks guys

 

mentaldisorder
2010-02-27T17:22:51Z

To answer your first question, you're not guaranteed anything with overclocking.  Not all cpu's/gpu's can attain the same overclock, and thus, not all can achieve 10% or 20% etc.  It's really the luck of the draw.

I don't understand your second question.  Are you saying to spend more money on a higher performing stock cpu?  Or are you saying that overclocking will cost you more money?

Marius Malek
2010-02-27T18:01:27Z

Ah, sorry for the confusion. 

My second question was sort of a round off of the first one. I've been told by a few friends that overclocking the i7 series processors aren't even worth it because of the small percentage increase of performance. 

I was wondering if buying overclocking gear for my computer would even be worth the money - considering the small chances of getting a decent performance increase. 

Super Dave
2010-03-01T00:19:00Z

Marius Malek wrote:

I've been told by a few friends that overclocking the i7 series processors aren't even worth it because of the small percentage increase of performance. 

What's wrong with a small-percentage increase in performance? I live for that kind of stuff! If I'm going to spend the big buck$ and a bunch of time building a rig, then I'm going to tweak it and wring every last bit of performance out of it. It gives me a great deal of satisfaction, and it helps me to learn a lot, too. Since you posted your overclock query, I suspect that you are the same kind of guy, Marius![:D]


Der Meister
2010-03-01T13:35:41Z

indeed whats the point in running stock? I have a 40% OC on my i7 at the moment from what i have seen it gets me about a 12-15% increase in performance.

Marius Malek
2010-03-01T16:13:44Z

I haven't paid much attention to overclocking until now, and I'm really curious about its benefits and drawbacks. 

I want my new computer to the the workforce and my man cave escape all in one. Basically, I'm looking for a computer that can edit and render hi definition video in high definition formats. Yet at the same time eat the latest and greatest video games for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. 

I'm unsure which route to take in this issue, and wether or not overclocking would grant me anything substantial. 

I know I'm sounding a little vague but I'm not really sure what to ask at this moment, but the feedback from you guys are really helping. 

Lastly, if I do build this new computer suited for overclocking, would you recommend liquid cooling? Even if I don't, I still feel like I should have liquid cooling. But then that draws up another issue about maintenance and the such. 

I just want to make sure I have everything thought out before I sink some money, if I even get the chance too. =D

nelsoncp21
2010-03-01T17:35:08Z

Mostly guys overclock because they can, they want bragging rights or they just want to get every bit of performance out of their money. Others might spend less on the hardware and overclock. For instance cpu A runs stock at 2.4ghz and costs $300 while cpu B runs 2.66ghz stock and costs $500. If you can spend $40 on an air cooler and get that cpu A to run stable at cpu B's speeds then it's plenty of justification.

Der Meister
2010-03-01T22:52:25Z

^indeed.

As for air vs. water. it really depends on how big of an OC you want. If you want the max your chip can do then water is the only way. but if you dont want to deal with it and its cost you can get a good air cooler for 60 or so and get a nice healthy OC.

mentaldisorder
2010-03-02T21:08:08Z

nelsoncp21 wrote:

Mostly guys overclock because they can, they want bragging rights or they just want to get every bit of performance out of their money. Others might spend less on the hardware and overclock. For instance cpu A runs stock at 2.4ghz and costs $300 while cpu B runs 2.66ghz stock and costs $500. If you can spend $40 on an air cooler and get that cpu A to run stable at cpu B's speeds then it's plenty of justification.

That's the way I look at building computers.  I try to max my savings, by overclocking, which was the initial reason overclocking started, I believe.  Overclocking when I started getting into computers was different from the public than it is now.  The main reason used to be for the savings, but now, as mentioned previously, it's for bragging rights.  Although it's not a bad thing, it's just more competitive now.

Inspector
2010-03-02T21:21:32Z

HA 😃 only mods and thread starter is posting in here im going to break that line [;)]

I need a new cpu before i should start overclocking anything -.-. Theres no point in being competitive when it comes to overclocking because you don't win anything 😛 lol, as long as your happy with what you got your good!

note: you spelled the title wrong 🙂...

Marius Malek
2010-03-02T22:03:25Z

Crap, I didn't even notice T.T

mentaldisorder
2010-03-06T23:39:51Z

Inspector wrote:

Theres no point in being competitive when it comes to overclocking because you don't win anything 😛 lol, as long as your happy with what you got your good!

Heh, you're never happy with overclocking.  You ALWAYS want to keep pushing your overclock, at least the hardcore enthusiast does.

bob_on_the_cob
2010-03-07T00:53:02Z

I guess I have always been in the overclocking to get better running parts for cheaper camp. My old CPU a 1.8GHz Core2duo e4300 I overclocked to 3.0GHz and ran it like that. I got it for cheap at the time $100 and pushed it into the $300+ CPU speeds. I did push it to see how much I could get out of it. I think I got it up to 3.5ish or something, but I never ran it day in day out at that speed. Now that I have a 3GHz Quad (Q9650) I am still a year later running it at stock speeds. It is watercooled. The watercooling system carried over from my old CPU so I could push it but I am still happy with the performance. Now in another year or so when it is not fast enough to keep up with games I will push it. Hoping it will get 4GHz, but like said above nothing is guaranteed with overclocking.

 

Anyway sorry for the long story. Back to the answers now. Is overclocking worth it? To me Yes for both getting cheaper parts on a budget and making them run like parts I can't afford and for pushing a older part that is just not quite fast enough so you can get the performance needed until the time or money comes around for upgrades.

As far as air or water cooling. I would recommend sticking with air cooling to get your feet wet in overclocking. Watercooling can carry quite a heavy pricetag for a good system and I wouldn't recommend getting it until you know you wanna spend the time it takes to overclock.

Devil_Dante
2010-03-22T02:06:39Z

I've only got one game, and that is Audiosurf, which I friend of mine gifted to me. Until I get a better PC, I won't be getting any games on Steam. (Crappy integrated graphics cards)

barmmer
2010-04-10T05:10:57Z

If you have watercooling installed definitly overclock....just make sure to time out the purchase of CPU and other components along with the support for games. For example, 2003-2004 was an excellent year to purchase a PC with the release of Doom 3 and HL 2. Those two games were the benchmark for PC performance just as Crysis continues to be and eventually Crysis 2.