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Offline paul  
#1 Posted : Friday, October 10, 2014 9:24:59 AM(UTC)
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Open mouth and insert foot. It's what every public speaker hopes to avoid, only Microsoft chief Satya Nadella wasn't so lucky when he casually addressed the topic of pay raises for women who work in technology. While speaking to a room full of mostly females at a conference designed to celebrate women in computing, Nadella drew criticism for suggesting that lady workers in technology refrain from asking for raises and instead pin their hopes on karma.

"It's not really about asking for the raise, but knowing and having faith that the system will actually give you the right raises as you go along," Nadella said at the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing. "Because that's good karma. It'll come back because somebody's going to know that's the kind of person that I want to trust."

Satya Nadella
Image Source: Flickr (Bhupinder Nayyar)

Though it wasn't a particularly tense moment on stage -- Maria Klawe, president of Harvey Mudd College and a Microsoft board member, told Nadella that his opinion on the topic was one of the very few that she disagrees with, then went on to hug him -- Nadella's comments set off a storm of criticism in social media.

Hours after being on stage, Nadella pulled an about-face and apologized on Twitter for his comments.


Nadella also addressed his comments in a memo to employees telling them that he answered the question "completely wrong" and that he believes "men and women should get equal pay for equal work." Moreover, he suggested that Klawe's advice was more accurate -- "If you think you deserve a raise, you should just ask."

The CEO's comments come just days after Microsoft released diversity data. According to Microsoft, 29 percent of its workers are women, up from 24 percent a year ago.

"Have we made progress? Yes, we certainly have, and I am proud of the progress we have made. But we can all agree that much work remains to be done to increase the diversity of our company and the tech industry," Lisa Brummel, Executive Vice President of Human Resources at Microsoft, stated in a letter to employees on the topic of workplace diversity.
Offline acarzt  
#2 Posted : Friday, October 10, 2014 11:41:10 AM(UTC)
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It's like people are intentionally trying to take his words out of context on purpose. I understood what he meant from the original text... He thinks women should not HAVE to ask for raises, that they should be getting paid the same fair wage as everyone else.

People are too sensitive and need to stop trying to make something out of nothing... This article is just perpetuating the madness.

Offline SeanPatrickCarey  
#3 Posted : Friday, October 10, 2014 12:36:55 PM(UTC)
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You are exactly correct. His point was they shouldnt have to ask, and shouldtn be expected to need to ask. But, all everyone heard was "Women shouldnt ask for raises, because Women shouldnt ask for raises."

Offline clearvoice  
#4 Posted : Friday, October 10, 2014 3:07:58 PM(UTC)
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The onslaught from the left will take this and twist it upside-down and right-side up

Offline Ricofrost  
#5 Posted : Friday, October 10, 2014 5:23:37 PM(UTC)
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OMG press will get upset over anything. WOW grow up people Im sure he would have said the same thing if they asked how what a "man" do this....

Offline RobertJohnAmanse  
#6 Posted : Saturday, October 11, 2014 10:31:34 AM(UTC)
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back pedal

Offline kalqlate  
#7 Posted : Sunday, October 12, 2014 5:16:22 PM(UTC)
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Hahaha... You guys are missing the full context, and making excuses for his poor lack of judgement. Here's the full context:

"You know, the thing that perhaps most influenced me in terms of how do you look at the journey or a career. There was this guy, his name is Mike Naples, he was the president of Microsoft when I joined and he had this saying that all HR systems are long-term efficient, short-term inefficient. And I thought that this phrase captured it.

It's not really about asking for the raise but knowing and having faith that the system will actually give you the right raises as you go along. And that I think might be one of the additional superpowers that quite frankly women who don't ask for raises have. Because that's good karma, that'll come back. Because somebody's going to know that's the kind of person that I want to trust; that's the kind of person that I want to really give more responsibility to; and in the long term, efficiency things catch up.

And I wonder — and I'm not saying that's the only approach — I wonder if taking the long term helps solve for what might be perceived as this uncomfortable thing as am I getting paid right, am I getting rewarded right. Because the reality is your best work is not followed with your best rewards. Your best work then has impact, people recognize it and then you get the rewards. So I think you have to think that through I think."

He's basically telling women to have faith in the system, and that it would look better for them not to make noise about any salary discrepancies. That by not making noise, the woman can rely on others to EVENTUALLY assess that they are doing a worthy job and EVENTUALLY her salary will grow to match those of others at her level.

Haha... really? A woman should have faith in the system that systematically creates the discrepancy? Really? By not making noise, it will allow others to trust you more... PERHAPS enough to give you a much deserved raise? Really? That a woman should avoid asking for a raise, just like a man does, when he/she feels like they deserve it?

Basically, Nadella is saying that if a woman finds that she is being paid less for the same work, that she should simply keep working and expect the respect that others come to have in her quiet diligence will cause her pay to equalize eventually rather than RIGHT NOW when it is deserved.

Sorry, it is YOU who took his words out of context because you were not given the full context.

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