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  •  paul
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2012-08-27T11:48:32Z
Like most memory makers, Kingston is no stranger to the solid state drive market, but up until now, the company hasn't released an SSD specifically for the enterprise crowd. That all changed with the introduction of Kingston's SSDNow E100, the company's first enterprise-class SSD for mission critical applications.

According to Kingston, the SSDNow E100 is infused with technologies that add up to an SSD that offers 10 times more endurance over typical client-grade SSDs. Specifically, Kingston says its SSDNow E100 is good for 30,000 program/erase cycles, compared to 3,000 program/erase cycles inherent on client SSDs.

Kingston SSDNow E100 Series

"Companies worldwide have come to depend on Kingston server memory for reliability and performance," said Ariel Perez, SSD business manager, Kingston. "We are proud to introduce the SSDNow E100 enterprise-class SSD to help organizations handle such initiatives as big data and virtualized environments. The drive’s higher endurance and reliability, along with higher IOPS make it an integral part of a datacenter where uninterrupted 24/7 operation is mission critical."

The SSDNow E100 is shipping in 100GB, 200GB, and 400GB capacities. Performance varies by model, topping out at up to 535MB/s read and 500MB/s write speeds, and up to 59,000 random 4K read IOPS (200GB model) and up to 83,000 write IOPS (100GB model).

No word yet on price or availability.
Erakith
2012-08-27T12:29:36Z

Holy shitballs that's a lot of write cycles. Kudos to Kingston for that.

Pricing will give us an indication of the value here, but given that there was a $70 difference between the HyperX 3k and HyperX drives, and the only difference was 2k more write cycles.. I can see this being quite pricey.

JOMA
  •  JOMA
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2012-08-27T13:37:16Z

Price will be interesting to see but that is impressive performance and the jump in write cycles is a pretty huge leap.

Jaybk26
2012-08-27T13:41:43Z

What does it take to be part of the "enterprise-class?"

KAdair
2012-08-27T14:43:35Z

I actually own the hyperX 3K SSD, its great for me. I bought it because of the cheaper price and the reliability.

I can only imagine what a drive thats 400GB with all those write cycles is gonna cost... CHA-CHING!

JOMA
  •  JOMA
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2012-08-27T16:50:51Z
Enterprise class may contain faster memory, different types of memory, are meant to operate 24/7, have higher quality (or should) components and are meant for mission critical applications. In theory they should perform better and operate longer without failure.

This is how IBM defines enterprise class on their site:

Enterprise server and storage users would likewise never consider a 5400 RPM mobile SATA HDD for use in a performance oriented, business critical application in the data center. Even though a mobile SATA HDD reads, writes and stores data the same way as any other 15K RPM drive, it doesn’t meet the enterprise’s needs.

This same reasoning can be applied to using a low cost, consumer SATA SSD in these same mission critical applications. Even low cost SATA SSDs are faster than HDDs. But they are not as capable as a true enterprise class SSD. They store data the same way as the other SAS or FC SSDs, so why not use it and save some money…?

The answers are the same as HDD considerations. Data centers don’t use the 5400 RPM mobile drives for several critical reasons; trust, reliability, life expectancy, data retention, redundancy and performance.

Under the same considerations, consumer-grade SATA SSDs designed for consumer applications lack the critical ‘designed for enterprise’ capabilities that are necessary for today’s data centers. Key to these designed for enterprise features include dual porting, end-to-end data integrity inside the drive to protect data on the fly, rigorous specification and testing of all components, interface compatibility and technologies that work in the enterprise systems (rather than having to adapt the enterprise infrastructure to support the drive).

NKR
  •  NKR
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2012-08-27T18:02:56Z

Whoa a 400GB SSD!

Lead_filler
2012-08-27T19:04:28Z
PKumar
2012-08-27T19:11:11Z

The days where SSD truely replaces HDDs are coming

DDK
  •  DDK
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2012-08-27T19:17:58Z

Pricing is awful though

NSadhasivam
2012-08-27T19:25:31Z

Have been waiting for a long time to try SSDs

RRajan
2012-08-27T19:33:12Z

535MB/s read and 500MB/s write ?

great !

thunderdan602
2012-08-27T20:27:09Z

This is a sweet little drive. Would love to get one for an upgrade. Reading the 30,0000 program/erase.cycles made my nipples hard.

thunderdan602
2012-08-27T20:27:21Z

This is a sweet little drive. Would love to get one for an upgrade. Reading the 30,0000 program/erase cycles made my nipples hard.

nicoletoledo
2012-08-27T20:38:34Z

Its all about the price now. But if you are an enthusiast no matter what the price youll save up for it. Top ramen for a few months wont hurt lol