darkshark08
2007-06-25T02:36:50Z
I was planning to buy a Dell XPS M1210 notebook, which has a customizable CPU. The available CPU's are as follows:

Intel Core" 2 Duo T7200 (2.00GHz, 4MB L2 Cache, 667 MHz FSB) [base price]
Intel Core" 2 Duo T7400 (2.16GHz, 4MB L2 Cache, 667 MHz FSB) [$175 more]
Intel Core" 2 Duo T7600 (2.33GHz, 4MB L2 Cache, 667 MHz FSB) [$425 more]

As you can see, for $175 more by upgrading from a T7200 to a T7400, all you gain is just 0.16 GHz in clock speed. Is that even worth it?
Der Meister
2007-06-25T03:28:35Z
SilentSpectre
2007-06-25T18:48:23Z
Depends on what you're doing. If you're somebody who simply HAS to have the best performance (ie video editing, 3d rendering, etc.) then it might be worth it. If you're not one of those people, and you'd know if you were, then I'm with Der on this one. You'd probably not notice a big difference. A general rule of thumb is that even in CPU intensive apps, you can notice about 50% of the delta in real gains so long as nothing is holding you back. Keep in mind that's just a broad generalization. Anyhow, the delta is about 8% in raw clock speeds, you'd be lucky to see 4% gain off of it.

You'd also likely see it suck down the juice at a slightly increased rate too.
Super Dave
2007-06-25T23:16:29Z
mazuk
2008-04-30T10:09:18Z

In this case, clock speed doesn't mean everything....i mean have look at those speeds its only another 330mhz difference and charging you another $425. I would say hell no to that just stick with the base T7200 and oc or something and buy a aftermarket cooler would save you all that money. 

RyuGTX
2008-04-30T22:21:24Z

mazuk wrote:

In this case, clock speed doesn't mean everything....i mean have look at those speeds its only another 330mhz difference and charging you another $425. I would say hell no to that just stick with the base T7200 and oc or something and buy a aftermarket cooler would save you all that money. 

 

Aftermarket cooler? For a laptop??? You aren't talking about those crap notebook coolers that you place your notebook on top right? 

mazuk
2008-05-01T08:54:41Z

I applogise, i completley went off on one and forgot this was a laptop we are talking about here...

Laggerzero
2008-05-01T11:13:09Z
In a notebook I really wouldn't worry about the closckeed of the processor that much if the cost difference is that great. If it was to a processor with a higher FSB or lower manufacturing process I would say hell yeah. But I would invest in other things in the notebook before you buy like harddrives with higher RPMS, better graphics cards, and more memory. Try to keep the system balanced and not just a mediocre system with a very good CPU
rapid1
2008-05-21T08:57:30Z

you can upgrade the cooling in a laptop. the solution you put on the cpu is the first thing. then upgrading the fans but I would'nt buy that way personally. Check these sites out ( http://www.microexpress.net/proddisp.asp?category=Laptop ) ( http://www.avadirect.com/Notebooks/Core_2_Notebooks ) I like the CLEVO bodies (last few selections in INTEl Laptops) these are totally customizable (can you say I already have a copy of windows and the software I want on my desktop) Plus there way more cost effective in performance and value. Then you get what you wants cutomized and for a great price.

 

dizowned
2008-06-16T14:09:41Z

Pure clock speed isnt that important when your talking about those small differences, but the difference in those processors is not just clock speed, the main thing thats increasing the clock speed is that there factory overclocking it by increasing the multiplier in each case. This will give you a overall 330mhz bump in processor speed, with the guarantee from intel that its just as stable as the 2.00ghz variant. So if history has taught us anything it just means your getting the cream of the crop as far as the fab processing goes. i.e. Those parts that operated stable out of spec when they came out of the oven.