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Ghettochild2600
2016-05-16T17:37:29Z
I'm having issues with this Asus Eeebox 206. Thought maybe it was the hard drive so I tried another one. Both drives work just fine in my other computers. Tried different bios versions. Took the whole thing apart and everything looks ok. Closest I've been able to get this to work is partitioning and preparing the drive on another computer, but then it still ends up getting errors.

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James@PCPosh
2016-05-16T20:04:47Z
Since I'm not really seeing any way a faulty SATA cable could cause your issue, my next best bet would be the power supply. Before jumping to any conclusions, however, I'd use the driver manufacturer's bootable diagnostic utility, note the result, and then move the drive to a different machine and run the diag again.

If you get different results using the manufacturer utility on the same drive, than odds are it's the power supply providing unstable or otherwise insufficient power.
tmanvest
2016-05-17T02:23:39Z
weird question have you set the settings in your bios to default? if not give it a try and let me know if anything changes.
Ghettochild2600
2016-05-17T15:49:05Z
It won't boot if I set the settings to default (booting from usb flash drive) other than boot order though bios is set to default settings. Not really much for this machine as far as the bios goes. There is a hacked bios version that unlocks over clocking, however I'm not using that version though as it's an older one. I checked the power on time with the hard drive that it came with and it was only 153 hours. Practically a brand new machine when I bought it ($7 at a yardsale). Power supply is 12v 4amps. Tested with a multimeter and output should be sufficient. Don't have another power supply to test.
tmanvest
2016-05-17T16:01:10Z
your powersupply will have a rating on the side.
Ghettochild2600
2016-05-17T20:46:24Z

your powersupply will have a rating on the side.



12v 4amps output is what it says on the power supply.
James@PCPosh
2016-05-18T00:08:41Z
I think what tmanvest is asking is for your power supply's specs. For example, I'm running a Cooler Master V1200, which is a 1200 watt power supply with an "80 Plus Platinum" rating.
Ghettochild2600
2016-05-18T18:55:50Z
James@PCPosh
2016-05-19T19:56:40Z
Ah - okay, I see what I've done... Someway, somehow, I completely failed to notice the "Eee" in your OP or title (no, I don't know how I pulled that off), and I just began standard troubleshooting methods for a conventional desktop.

The EEE micros, however, are far from being traditional desktops. They're more like little laptops, if we're talking about how they're engineered (no PCI expansion capabilities, onboard power regulation and distribution, etc).

This is a critical distinction because it means that if your hard drive isn't receiving stable and consistent power: It's not the fault of your PSU (because you don't have one), it's the fault of your motherboard. On fully integrated systems like this, you sacrifice the luxory of individual componants, by and large. So if something goes wrong with your GPU, you have a broken motherboard, not just a card replacement. If something goes wrong with your PSU, you have a broken motherboard, not just a need for a new power supply. So on, so forth.

So, unfortunately, that's the bad news -- from what all you've written here, you appear to have a motherboard that does not function reliably. Depending on how much tedium you want to put forth in testing and replacing individual capacitors with your super human soldering skills, a repair MIGHT be possible, but in all probability the issue rests within an IC and is beyond repair and must, instead, be replaced.

Which is the worse news -- I've searched around a bit, and I can't find a motherboard for the 206 for any cheaper than $95, and that's coming used and untested with no warranty from some shady eBayer. For $20 less you can just buy a whole other 206 used but with non functional wifi, according to the description.