News
  •  Shawn
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2010-01-29T14:46:34Z
Ready for a real shocker? That texting and driving habit you've been trying to kick may not be as bad for you as the insurance companies have led you to believe. Of course, we would still recommend putting the phone down while you're driving (we're speaking for all those cars around you, for the record), but an interesting new survey has unearthed some unexpected results.

For years, we've seen state after state ban texting and driving after being told by insurance company-funded surveys that it significantly increases the risk of a crash. And frankly, it makes sense. Doing anything other than driving while attempting to drive is probably not in the best interest of personal safety. At any rate, the Highway Loss Data Institute recently "compared collisions of 100 insured vehicles per year in four different jurisdictions before and after bans on handheld cell phone use took effect." The study focused on incidents in New York, Washington, D.C., Connecticut and California, and believe or not, they found that "state laws that ban drivers from talking on hand-held cell phones seem to have no effect on crash rates."



According to the study, monthly fluctuations in crash rates "didn't change after bans were enacted," and now investigations are being done to see why the findings clash so significantly with earlier assumptions. One thing's for sure--even if texting and driving is statistically "safe," you'll still get written up with a ticket if you're caught in a state where it's illegal, and we still don't condone it around these parts. 
3vi1
  •  3vi1
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2010-01-30T15:03:19Z

>> they found that "state laws that ban drivers from talking on hand-held cell phones seem to have no effect on crash rates."

BECAUSE PEOPLE DON'T FOLLOW THE LAWS.

The article title is misleading. The study found no such thing.

gibbersome
2010-01-30T15:22:54Z

Agreed 3vi1. The study only showed that the number of crashes was the same before and after the law was enacted. It's a leap to say that the number of text-related crashes remained the same as well.

To accurately measure texting-related crashes, at the point of each accident the cop would have to check the user's phone history and see if they were texting at the time of the incident. However, this would also break several privacy laws.

3vi1
  •  3vi1
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2010-01-30T15:58:02Z

>> However, this would also break several privacy laws.

We can make a new law that makes it legal: Let's call it The Patriots Have Nothing To Hide Act. Make it a thousand pages long and with a name like that it will pass without anyone reading it.

It might be confused with a similar law already in effect, though - since that similarly named law already makes it legal for them to get your library records.

Soupstyle
2010-01-30T16:51:44Z

> BECAUSE PEOPLE DON'T FOLLOW THE LAWS.

This is the key, people are going to keep doing what they want to do until they get caught, get in an accident or gets them hurt.

3vi1
  •  3vi1
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2010-01-30T17:09:20Z

True dat. And unfortunately, the "getting caught" in this instance potentially involves loss of life.

Inspector
2010-01-30T17:35:47Z

People only learn from mistakes, they don't try to prevent it in till it happens. its just how many people live life. I won't test and drive but people will, theres no stoping it.

Bighorse
2010-01-30T18:02:00Z

Eventually lawmakers are gonna force automakers to put in a device to block all cell phone traffic while the automobile is running. Or utilize more technology like Ford's sync with other automakers to keep cell phone use almost completely hands free.

3vi1
  •  3vi1
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2010-01-30T19:06:45Z

>> Eventually lawmakers are gonna force automakers to put in a device to block all cell phone traffic while the automobile is running.

Better solution: You have to enter a code if you want to text while moving. That way, if you're locked in the trunk, you can append *#911 to your 911 call and let the call go through.

i.e. they should tackle this on the providrer end, not in roving blackout-mobiles.

Inspector
2010-01-30T19:28:17Z

3vi1 wrote:

>> Eventually lawmakers are gonna force automakers to put in a device to block all cell phone traffic while the automobile is running.

Better solution: You have to enter a code if you want to text while moving. That way, if you're locked in the trunk, you can append *#911 to your 911 call and let the call go through.

i.e. they should tackle this on the providrer end, not in roving blackout-mobiles.

Mind explaining that more to me? i didn't under stand it...

acarzt
  •  acarzt
  • 100% (Exalted)
  • Advanced Member
2010-01-30T23:43:46Z

the rates didn;t change because people are still gonna do whatever they want because they don't care.

rapid1
2010-01-31T00:02:19Z

Hey 3vi1 I have been asking why this is not automatically done. I think it should be an auto speaker placement unit. My GPS can auto connect to your cell phone through Blue Tooth, it can also broadcast sound through the speakers on a free FM band. So why not make the car disable if the unit is not in a cradle when on, if on and not in the cradle it will auto shut down if the car is one as well.The thing about this is it cost nothing to implement except the auto ignition control. So it would be rather low dollar to achieve. If you do not have it in your car you cannot renew your new tag. You also would not be able to text in the cradle. I personally think driving and texting is definitely not very bright. I can talk on the phone and drive and have since 91, it is of course easiest with a bluetooth head set. Either way I have been involved in 2 accidents in my life neither were my fault and I have been doing this for 20 years and also been a professional driver.

rapid1
2010-01-31T01:01:50Z

this though may need some expansion, but it seems valid to me.

gibbersome
2010-01-31T08:22:32Z

>>The Patriots Have Nothing To Hide Act

LOL! Reminds me what Google's CEO said, "If You Have Something You Don't Want Anyone To Know, Maybe You Shouldn't Be Doing It"

realneil
2010-01-31T11:40:40Z

OnStar calling is safe. Bluetooth is close enough too, but I don't believe any study calling it safe (or even NOT dangerous) to text and drive at the same time.