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RSmith
2011-12-10T20:12:35Z

I got one of those as well :)  It was free, and it's faster than an HDD, but I'm disappointed in what the rated speeds are.  It actually writes slower than it's V100 counterpart, but reads faster.  So confusing.  i was actually planning on possibly seeing how they'd do in a RAID 0 together, but not if the differences are that much off.  The V100 is SATA2, the V200 is SATA3, but both have SATA2 performance, I don't get it, especially the lower write speeds of the V200.

 

V100 = 250/230 Read/Write, SATA 1 & 2 compatible

V200 = 300/190 Read/Write, SATA 1, 2 & 3 compatible

 

I am confused by this, lol.

Der Meister
2011-12-10T23:05:45Z

While the write speeds are slower, the Reads are faster and its a Sata 3 drive. So while it might not be a stellar improvement its an improvement. 

DDeveaux
2011-12-13T01:14:33Z

I'm a big fan of SSDs even though they are pricey.  This became really apparent when I would switch between a desktop (with 2 SSDs in RAID 0) to my laptop (which had a 1.8" 120GB HDD - 5400rpm at most).  

Ever since tossing in an 80GB Intel X-18M (2nd gen) in there, it made a world of a difference in the performance of this little notebook.  Sadly, that's about the last upgrade this system is going to see, since not many companies make 1.8" SSDs.  

Once you go SSD, it's hard to go back to mechanical storage.

RSmith
2011-12-13T03:53:36Z

When one half is improved, yet the other half is the total opposite, you can't really say it's any improvement at all.  now if it had 290 write instead of it's 190, then that would be an improvement.  Also, making a drive SATA III-compatible and giving it SATA II speeds is pointless.

erikiksaz
2011-12-15T02:36:27Z

I didn't really buy into the SSD craze before I started to play games, but after recently getting back into gaming, I wouldn't know what I would do without the SSD.  Things just load so much faster.

nhwynter
2012-01-14T11:46:05Z

I'm curious if anyone has a PCIe SSD and what you think of them.  I've had my eye on a Revo x2 (220GB) but wanted to get some input before making a decision.. 

cowboyspace
2012-01-19T12:18:26Z

It's fast and I bet you won't be dissapointed with its performance with one of those  PCIe SSD.

karanm
2012-01-20T11:59:09Z

The PCIe SSD is still relatively new so I cant comment on the durability of this factor, the speed is supposed to be extremely fast but I have read some reviews that claim the opposite and articles that say that running normal SSDs in RAID can give you the same performance. The cost per Gb is what I look at and to me the performance gain over a regular SSD doesn't seem worth it. Getting a good SSD with TRIM support is in my opinion the best option for anyone looking for an upgrade from mechanical hard drives. From a pure performance standpoint here is how I see the different offerings for storage devices

1- PCIe SSD's

2- Normal SSD's 

3- Hybrid Drives (This is another interesting option, more on it below)

4-Mechanical Hard drives

 

I recently saw that Seagate has launched 7200 rpm hard drives (500gb and 750 gb versions) that have 4gb of SLC NAND flash on them. They work in a similar fashion to Intel's Smart response technology and therefore seem great for boot times and opening frequently used programs. A great option for laptops but also good for desktops users that want better performance than their mechanical hard drives but don't want to empty their wallets in order to get the space they need. I don't know if these hybrid drives perform better than Intel's SRT but for people without this feature getting a Hybrid drive may be the best option without breaking the bank.

Hope this helps and please post if I have made a mistakes in any of my views since I don't have any experience with the PCIe SSD's or the new Hybrid Drives.

realneil
2012-01-20T12:24:53Z

karanm wrote:

I don't know if these hybrid drives perform better than Intel's SRT but for people without this feature getting a Hybrid drive may be the best option without breaking the bank.


I have a system

with Intel's Rapid Storage Technology on it. I have a 60GB OCZ SATA-III drive

that is accelerating a 1TB, 64MB Cache, Western Digital 7,200RPM SATA-III Drive.

I also have a

momentous 500GB drive in another PC.

The Momentous is

~not~ faster than the RST system is, but it's faster than a regular platter

drive is.

It ~Learns~ as you

use it and it keeps your most used files in the nand flash memory area for

faster response times. It's priced right too.

The RST system is

not as fast as having a SSD Drive

as your boot drive either. It just accelerates a platter drive automatically,

without any intervention by you.


karanm
2012-01-20T12:57:05Z

Thanks realneil, if the hybrid drives are slower than the Intel's SRT Tech then I guess it goes back to the same old questions about SSD's, whether you are willing to the pay the higher price for better performance but less space. 

cowboyspace
2012-01-20T13:11:09Z

pay the higher price for better performance and space doesn't matter if you got  a huge case :) and some water cooling

realneil
2012-01-20T13:31:09Z

karanm wrote:

Thanks realneil, if the hybrid drives are slower than the Intel's SRT Tech then I guess it goes back to the same old questions about SSD's, whether you are willing to the pay the higher price for better performance but less space.

Intel's RST is

actually a very civilized solution. (it's trouble free and you don't have to babysit it for it to just work) I use an ASRock Z68 Mainboard with a 2600K

processor in it and it's a fast solution. The 1TB accelerated drive gives me

some room for storage, and did I say it's fast?

There are a lot of

SSD makers coming out with SSD Caching Solutions that use smaller SSD's, but

they all rely on software to speed up a traditional rotational platter drive.

In the next few months you will see another reduction in the prices of SSD

drives. It may be worth it to wait until then.

The best solution

would probably be two SSD's in RAID-0 (as large as you can afford) with 15% of

their space left unallocated and unused. SSD Trim support for RAID will be

released before long as well.

 

cowboyspace
2012-01-21T11:35:55Z

"The hard drive market is reacting to the heavy floods in Thailand." which means lower prices for SSD and higher prices for HDD. 

 

@realneil   nice answers pretty 

understandable  and detailed.

realneil
2012-01-21T12:07:29Z
Jheck1
2012-01-21T15:52:21Z

I have an SSd in my Lenovo laptop...not the fastest one, but it's still a ton faster than an hdd.  I aslo recently added a newer OCZ sata 3 90gb SSD to my gaming desktop...now that is a HUGE difference.   

No way i'll ever go back to hdd again...at least not for the OS and games.