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I26
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2003-12-16T18:34:02Z
I have an HP 3300C scanner that would not work. I found a fuse that looks blown and decided to test it by using alum. foil to bypass it.....and it worked. How the heck can i go about fixing this fuse. It seems to be soldered pretty good inside those caps at each end. I am not the greatest at soldering but willing to try if there is no other option. Will I be able to find a fuse that small? All this time not working so i rip it up and its a $.02 fuse......WTF!!?!?!?
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I26
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2003-12-16T20:05:07Z
Ok....fuse it out. Now does anyone know where I can find a fuse this small? Its 250V25A fuse about 3/8" long. Gonna be a hard find.
Ramman
2003-12-17T08:30:10Z
What you're looking for is an axial leaded fuse. Bussmann makes those (BK/ABC-V-25)

Try here: www.dee-inc.com 

What I would do, and have done in the past, is to solder a fuse holder (automotive twist style is fine) in place and use a standard 3AG fuse. These are about $0.75 for a pack of 5 in the 25A size.

Go to Radio Shack and pick up a desoldering tool and clear out the holes in the PCB where the fuse was. Solder in the fuse holder, install the fuse and you're back in business. This way you can easily change out the fuse if it ever blows again.

The manufacturers use those axial fuses so most people have to send the product back to get it fixed. That way a $3 fix (includes fuse holder and fuse) now costs about $50 or more .
I26
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2003-12-17T19:33:24Z
Quote:

Originally posted by Ramman
What you're looking for is an axial leaded fuse. Bussmann makes those (BK/ABC-V-25)

Try here: www.dee-inc.com 

What I would do, and have done in the past, is to solder a fuse holder (automotive twist style is fine) in place and use a standard 3AG fuse. These are about $0.75 for a pack of 5 in the 25A size.

Go to Radio Shack and pick up a desoldering tool and clear out the holes in the PCB where the fuse was. Solder in the fuse holder, install the fuse and you're back in business. This way you can easily change out the fuse if it ever blows again.

The manufacturers use those axial fuses so most people have to send the product back to get it fixed. That way a $3 fix (includes fuse holder and fuse) now costs about $50 or more .



I think it is a 2.5A/250V fuse not a 25A/250V Fuse. Its the size of a christmas light fuse found in the AC Plug end of christmas lights.
The company maintenance man at work says it is 250V due to the fact it was made in china or japan and he said no way it would be rated for 25A plus he said the size is a major tipoff. We think we can't see the "." in 2.5A. He usually knows his stuff well so I am gonna give it a try. The power supply is a 12Vdc @ 1.25A so it makes sense. What do u think I should try. I don't want an electrical fire.....LOL.
CompHobbyist
2003-12-17T21:33:56Z
Yes, it is probably 2.5A. Most fuses are rated at 250V so that you can use them in either 240/220V equipment or 120/110V equipment. The reason you can't get the endcaps off is because they are spot-welded onto the fuse. You can get a fuse like that at www.digikey.com.  If you want to make it easier next time, get PN# 270-739 at radio shack ($1.49 for 2 chassis mount holders), plus PN# 270-1008 ($1.59 for 4 250V/2.5A 1/4" x 1 1/4" fuses) and some bell wire.

The method I always use to remove parts that are bad anyways is to get a nail clipper, clip the leads off flush with the board on both sides, add a little new solder or electronics flux, then use a can of compressed air and a soldering iron to clean out the holes. I personally prefer the compressed air method to the solder-sucker method, as it seems to clean the hole out better. I melt the solder from the component side (very important as it's hard to clean splatters of solder off the component side of a board), then quickly move the soldering iron away, put the nozzle above the joint and about 1/8" away, then blast the solder and component lead fragment through the hole onto a sheet of paper or cardboard. Then I use the soldering iron and/or a hobby knife to clean up the splatters on the solder side of the board, and solder in the new component.

BTW, when in doubt get the smaller current rating fuse, as that way it'll just burn out when you turn the equipment on instead of allowing a possible overload and fire.
I26
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2003-12-17T21:37:12Z
Quote:

Originally posted by CompHobbyist
Yes, it is probably 2.5A. Most fuses are rated at 250V so that you can use them in either 240/220V equipment or 120/110V equipment. The reason you can't get the endcaps off is because they are spot-welded onto the fuse. You can get a fuse like that at www.digikey.com.  If you want to make it easier next time, get PN# 270-739 at radio shack ($1.49 for 2 chassis mount holders), plus PN# 270-1008 ($1.59 for 4 250V/2.5A 1/4" x 1 1/4" fuses) and some bell wire.

The method I always use to remove parts that are bad anyways is to get a nail clipper, clip the leads off flush with the board on both sides, add a little new solder or electronics flux, then use a can of compressed air and a soldering iron to clean out the holes. I personally prefer the compressed air method to the solder-sucker method, as it seems to clean the hole out better. I melt the solder from the component side (very important as it's hard to clean splatters of solder off the component side of a board), then quickly move the soldering iron away, put the nozzle above the joint and about 1/8" away, then blast the solder and component lead fragment through the hole onto a sheet of paper or cardboard. Then I use the soldering iron and/or a hobby knife to clean up the splatters on the solder side of the board, and solder in the new component.

BTW, when in doubt get the smaller current rating fuse, as that way it'll just burn out when you turn the equipment on instead of allowing a possible overload and fire.



The end caps eventually pulled right off and I can now stick in a new fuse. Thanx for the help.....
Ramman
2003-12-18T07:49:58Z
Sorry, looking at your original post you had 250V25A. So I assumed that was 25AMPS. The 2.5 rating makes more sense...