4hams
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2011-03-30T08:48:08Z

Nice work Peter and sorry i have not been around... 

acarzt
  •  acarzt
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2011-03-30T15:14:10Z

No clue, I haven't worked in a repair shop in some years, so I don't have my hands on the plethora of computers(many thousands lol) I used to in order to see these types of things occur.

But this was only a problem with the first generation of Athlon 64 and Athlon X2 chips and it seemed to be a problem with ALL of them. I still see these chips floating around here and there too. And really that information applies to any chip if it ever comes up. If you get an all 0's location... it doesn't exist.

I would think Memtest86 has come up with a work around for this... but it could be an issue built into the chips that software can't fix.

 

rrplay
2011-03-31T12:15:26Z

acarzt wrote:

But this was only a problem with the first generation of Athlon 64 and Athlon X2 chips and it seemed to be a problem with ALL of them. I still see these chips floating around here and there too. And really that information applies to any chip if it ever comes up. If you get an all 0's location... it doesn't exist.

I would think Memtest86 has come up with a work around for this... but it could be an issue built into the chips that software can't fix.

]

glad you posted re: Athlon 64 chips pretty sure my nephew still has a rig he built a while ago with one of these  or may be able to get check on someone that can spin up one the Memtest older and newer releases to see and if that's the case post back  not sure but will check it out.

 

 

omegadraco
2011-04-20T08:31:39Z

My ASUS boards have the same type of automatic overclocking. Granted I only have mine cranked up by 10% and am sure I could get a lot further but don't have the money to risk pushing too hard.

rrplay
2011-04-20T10:54:00Z

going to tidy n tweak this thread a bit with some PSU info that was posted recently elsewhere in this forum which applies to this particular thread.

realneil wrote:

So the best test that I could ascertain with using OCCT was the 'Power Supply' test. It runs Linpack (CPU) and also OCCT GPU test at the same time.

I downloaded it and then ran the power supply test for an hour right away, and it said that I passed the test. No scores were given, but it made graphs to look at.

I guess this is good for a mildly OC'd (3212.2MHz)Phenom II X2-545 Calisto CPU (3000.0 MHz)

**** let's take a look at some of the comments from

http://hothardware.com/cs/forums/t/54304.aspx?PageIndex=23

[quote user="Dave_HH"]

...not all PSUs are created equal.  An

850W PSU from one manufacturer could offer a lot more clean power than

another 850W PSU.  I can tell you that the boys at MainGear shake and

bake their systems so hard, that you'll likely never stress the system

as much as they do.  Also, when we toured the facility, I can tell you

the SHIFT systems I saw under burn-in had very quiet PSUs that were

barely breaking a sweat.

As well as :

realneil wrote:

.

As Dave says, loads of power really doesn't mean a thing unless it's

quality power, clean power, and with a high efficiency rating.

A high quality PSU is essential for system stability.

My

own experience with SeaSonic is that they are the best, and it's the

only brand that I use. Considering the catastrophic damage that a cheap

PSU can do to your components when they fail,.........I think of it as

'hedging my bet' when I use them.

A user could easily see the amount of fluctuations with those graphs in OCCT if you were comparing a PSU of generic quality.and one of higher quality like the Seasonics.

Some of the tests,monitoring apps,graphs etc can give you some idea what's going on with the 'shake n' bake ' the Maingear guys are doing.

In the meantime it's pretty easy to maximize your rig's performance, stability,and lifespan

Hence this thread.[:)]

 

rrplay
2011-04-20T11:07:05Z

DScheive wrote:

so where again do i get cpu_Z and gpu_Z? lol even though there is little reason for me to post my minimal laptop power on here im still curious :)

Ok you already have the links in a previous post and might as well just post the model number and specs run CPU-z CoreTemps and a standard IntelBurn @ 5 passes or OCCT post the screenie takes less than 5 minutes.who know you may have a laptop cooler and may notice a difference.with your temps.

This certainly is not intended to be power OC  ' bragging rights ' thread  .. just feel free to post who know's ?

you may have a bit of fun along the way and if the stability and temps are 'wacked' you'll be glad you did.[:)]

rrplay
2011-04-20T11:57:56Z

omegadraco wrote:

My ASUS boards have the same type of automatic overclocking. Granted I only have mine cranked up by 10% and am sure I could get a lot further but don't have the money to risk pushing too hard.

hey omegadraco thanks for stopping in   if you feel comfortable using the Asus auto OC great !![Y]

You may have already noticed that some of the early posts in this thread the Bios was manually tweaked. either way on those first few posts with the full system specs, bios info settings,PSU / GPU  chassis etc

along with CPU-Z CoreTemps IntelBurn the screenshots posted indicate a lot of info to share with others.

Takes about 5 minutes to run an IntelBurn 5 pass at Max ful 100% load & a lot less for standard. .Or run a burn in type test like OCCT along with your temps.

just a simple way to check stability, temps and prolong the system.who knows? some better cooling can make a big dif

As mentioned earlier in this thread the GPU OC stuff is in separate thread as requested by 4hams [Joel} that originated this thread

http://hothardware.com/cs/forums/t/54045.aspx

there are some remarks about evaluating your system [cooling PSU etc]> what you expect &  what you are comfortable doing

and besides it's Fun![:)]

 

realneil
2011-04-20T12:57:45Z

Something that I've not said before and some of you may not know already, is that when a video card maker suggests or even requires a PSU of 700 Watts (insert proper figure here) to support their card in your system, they're adding quite a bit of requirement to that figure simply because they already KNOW that all PSU's are not the same. Far too many people are saddled with cheap-ass power supplies that give wazoo specifications on the label, and then fail to meet them properly. Poorly designed PSU's abound in the marketplace. So card-makers are adding capacity to what they recommend, just to 'hedge their bet' a little bit. This ensures that their product works in more PC's without problems. Also, their product's reputation doesn't take the blame for poorly designed PSU's.

Actual measurements taken on many tech-savy sites show that most cards draw less power from the typical system than stated. So if you spend the extra money to buy a high quality PSU and don't fall for the advertising hype that seems to abound in this segment, you can safely and effectively get away with using one with a lower rating, thereby saving yourself a little on your power bill.

***SeaSonic***

4hams
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2011-04-21T10:32:22Z

realneil wrote:

Something that I've not said before and some of you may not know already, is that when a video card maker suggests or even requires a PSU of 700 Watts (insert proper figure here) to support their card in your system, they're adding quite a bit of requirement to that figure simply because they already KNOW that all PSU's are not the same. Far too many people are saddled with cheap-ass power supplies that give wazoo specifications on the label, and then fail to meet them properly. Poorly designed PSU's abound in the marketplace. So card-makers are adding capacity to what they recommend, just to 'hedge their bet' a little bit. This ensures that their product works in more PC's without problems. Also, their product's reputation doesn't take the blame for poorly designed PSU's.

Actual measurements taken on many tech-savy sites show that most cards draw less power from the typical system than stated. So if you spend the extra money to buy a high quality PSU and don't fall for the advertising hype that seems to abound in this segment, you can safely and effectively get away with using one with a lower rating, thereby saving yourself a little on your power bill.

***SeaSonic***

Hey realneil, you make a great point about not skimping on the PSU!  The amount of wattage is not as important as the fact that it is gold certified and produces Clean Current for your components!  I would choose a gold certified PSU at 750 watts before ever looking at a 1200 watt no name PSU! 

I think we use the same Seasonic 750 Watt 80 PLUS GOLD PSU?  Fantastic unit as far as I am concerned!  It replaced a Enermax MODU 82 PLUS Bronze certified PSU that was causing intermitent voltage spikes on my Sata power lines killing 5 barracudas and 2 OCZ vertex drives on me within a 2 year period... 

dadodgeson
2011-04-21T11:48:36Z

i like the thread. i realize that the 960 is limited on OC but if any members have or have had any experience with other types of CPU's it would be nice to see maby Dave could put up some.

i don't have a great understanding of overclocking so mine are stock if there is a thread to help explain some of the features of OC  please let me know

rrplay
2011-04-21T12:40:41Z

dadodgeson wrote:

i like the thread. i realize that the 960 is limited on OC but if any members have or have had any experience with other types of CPU's it would be nice to see maby Dave could put up some.

i don't have a great understanding of overclocking so mine are stock if there is a thread to help explain some of the features of OC  please let me know

here you go Dave already did and it's very well done as usual. & likely has a bit fun and encourages us to the same

http://hothardware.com/Articles/Intel-Core-i7-Overclocking--A-HotHardware-HowTo/

a simple basic how to can also be found here and HH member  4hams that started this great thread runs this site

http://mcstylists-overclock.forumotion.com/t12-excellent-intel-i7-oveclocing-guide

and of cousre this one and you may notice why the some of the posts in this thread include CPUZ CoreTemps and IntelBurn Max @5 passed in screenshots you may just spot a member with the same or similar cpu mobo combo you have and use a 'template' to get started as well

http://forums.pureoverclock.com/showthread.php?threadid=5736

just take a bit of time and make one change at a time that you understand and keep track of use the apps to monitor your changes and temps give your self the opportunity for relaxed and unstressed OC sessions and have a plan to to revert to stock if necessary.

 

rrplay
2011-04-21T21:29:06Z

Here is a little update with the Asetek 620 cooler with a modest OC on the i870 just & simple stable for day to day use very quiet and cool

Intel i7 870 Gigabyte H55N-USB3 mini atx Kingston memory hyperX 4GB 1600 Siverstone SST SG07 top intake 180mm 700/1200rpm 600W Silverstone 80+ PSU Antec 620 Hydro ATi HD 5770 [juniper]

 CPU Ratio: 24
Turbo Mode:Enabled
BCLK Frequency: 158
DRAM Frequency: 1580MHz
CPU Voltage: 1.256
DRAM Voltage: 1.58
***Load Line Calibration: Disabled [Auto] to follow Intel Spec rather than GB
QPI/Vtt 1.9V
Mem 9-9-9-24-1T

IntelBurnIn Max 8 thread pass takes about 5 minutes.

Pretty satisfied with it for most daily stuff. and likely to  a bit more the new Asetek cooler just going to leave here for a while.and take it up a bit higher with tighter timings mem clks another time.

enough to get an idea of what you be may be looking at should you do this and helps all of us if you post the sceenie.and settings.